ferretgerbil:  buddhism   
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about buddhism
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theravada buddhism

about meditation
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mindfulness in the body
mindfulness in plain english
one tool among many

four noble truths
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the origen of dukkha
the cessation of dukkha
the path to cessation of dukkha


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buddhism by the numbers: 10 fetters, 5 hindrances, 32 body parts
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There are these five facts that one should reflect on often, whether one is a woman or a man, lay or ordained. Which five?

‘I am subject to aging, have not gone beyond aging.’ This is the first fact that one should reflect on often, whether one is a woman or a man, lay or ordained.

‘I am subject to illness, have not gone beyond illness.’…

‘I am subject to death, have not gone beyond death.’…

‘I will grow different, separate from all that is dear and appealing to me.’…

‘I am the owner of my actions (kamma), heir to my actions, born of my actions, related through my actions, and have my actions as my arbitrator. Whatever I do, for good or for evil, to that will I fall heir.’…

The criteria for deciding what is worth saying
[1]
"In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be unfactual, untrue, unbeneficial (or: not connected with the goal), unendearing & disagreeable to others, he does not say them.
[2]
"In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, unbeneficial, unendearing & disagreeable to others, he does not say them.
[3]
"In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, beneficial, but unendearing & disagreeable to others, he has a sense of the proper time for saying them.
[4]
"In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be unfactual, untrue, unbeneficial, but endearing & agreeable to others, he does not say them.
[5]
"In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, unbeneficial, but endearing & agreeable to others, he does not say them.
[6]
"In the case of words that the Tathagata knows to be factual, true, beneficial, and endearing & agreeable to others, he has a sense of the proper time for saying them. Why is that? Because the Tathagata has sympathy for living beings."

Appropriate attention means asking the proper questions about phenomena, regarding them not in terms of self/other or being/non-being, but in terms of the four noble truths. In other words, instead of asking "Do I exist? Don't I exist? What am I?" one asks about an experience, "Is this stress? The origination of stress? The cessation of stress? The path leading to the cessation of stress?" Because each of these categories entails a duty, the answer to these questions determines a course of action: stress should be comprehended, its origination abandoned, its cessation realized, and the path to its cessation developed.                            Sabbasava Sutta



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